Norfolk Island
Philatelic Bureau
Stamps 2011
 
 
 
Museums Artefacts Part 2 Definitive
pt2 museums
 
Technical Details:
Issue Date: 22nd February 2011
Values: 15¢ 60¢ $1.20 $1.50 $1.80 $3.00
FDC $8.80
Designer: Mary Butterfield
Printer: Southern Colour Print NZ
Gutter:  
Prod. Qty:

40 000

This is the Part 2 of the artefacts found at our Kingston Museums.

Starting with the 15c stamp featuring a stove top iron from No 10 Quality Row a house built in 1844 for Forman of works and later occupied by Pitcairn families subsequent to their arrival in 1856.

The 60c stamp is of Thursday October Christian's mug showing the scratch mark denoting ownership, Thursday was born 1790, the son of Fletcher Christian and his Tahitian wife Mauatua .

The $1.20 stamp of Bone dominos from the Officer's Mess in the New Military Barracks, these dominos were made of bone inlaid with wood.

The $1.50 has a clay pipe and ceramics found in the convict hospital, a well used place, due to poor diet and savage punishment handed out to the unfortunate wretches who if they were not there, were engaged in hard labour.

Dolls feature on the $1.80 stamp which were rebuilt from fragments excavated from the privies of Quality Row house of all places, these no doubt would have belonged to the children of the officers stationed along this picturesque avenue.

On the $3.00 stamp you will find hair care artefacts made of wood and shell from the Melanesian Mission circa 1866-1890.

 
Seashells of Norfolk Island
Norfolk Seashells
Technical Details:
Issue Date: 21st April 2011
Values: 15¢ 60¢ $1.50 $1.80 $3.00
FDC $7.60
Designer: Mary Butterfield
Printer: Southern Colour Print NZ
Layout: 50 stamps/sheet 2 x 25
Prod. Qty:

15 000

In this issue of shells of Norfolk Island we find five of the many shells that are found on the beaches and rock pools of our shoreline.
Starting with the 15¢ we have a plicate Conch and a Zelebor Wentletrap. Wentletrap is derived from the dutch language meaning spiral stairs, these are also know as ladder or staircase shells!
Did you know some conch shells also make pearls and trumpets also that wentletrap shells are collected worldwide

Next on the 60¢ we have the Violet Snail and Ram's Horn shell, these are pelagic and normally wash up on the shore, so although being quite common, to find a good specimen is sometimes hard due to their fragile nature, being beaten by the waves against the shoreline tends to damage them! The ram's horn is also found under trees too. How can this be? It is because the white terns like to collect them too,well probably the terns eat the little squid and this shell is its buoyancy device!

The $1.50 stamp features the Captain and Hebrew Cone shell which belong to predatory snails that maybe are quite dangerous if one tries to take their house while they are still at home, Cone shell snails have a Venomous harpoon that they use to catch their food , so it is best to leave the live ones alone in peace!

The $1.80 has the Serpents Head and Pacific Dear Cowries which are very pretty Shells and quite collectable, however it is better to leave them alive in their pools. These cowries can grow quite large.
Cowries shells of various types have historically been used in various places worldwide as a form of money, also the old Italian word for these shells is the root for porcelain, as they do look like they are made of porcelain.

Lastly the $3.00 has the humble Hihi or Black Nerite and the Turreted Nerite, these live on the rocks surrounding Norfolk and are collected and eaten as a delicacy, normally in the form of hihi pie. the locals say "we gwen rum-ma " which means they are going along the rocks at night at low tide to collect hihi (and other seafood maybe too). They will not normally larn (tell/tull) where about they go as they think if they don't say where their patch is, the hihi will grow bigger and easier to process and eat. Because of where they live and eat they tend to have higher levels of rock minerals and maybe heavy metals, some people with seafood intolerance can react to this.
The Turreted Nerite (the striped one shown) is not as common as the Black Nerite which are normally completely black or black with a white patch or this white patch might just be the result of the black getting polished off by the rocks and surf.

National Parks 25 years of conservation
25 years conserving  plants
Technical Details:
Issue Date: 24th June 2011
Values: 25¢ 60¢ $1.55 $2.25
FDC $5.20
Designer: 2899 Design
Printer: Southern Colour Print NZ
Layout: 50 stamps/sheet 2 x 25
Prod. Qty:

15 000

 

In this Issue we celebrate 25 years of conservation in the Norfolk Island National Park. Four endangered endemic plant species are featured in this issue, which recognises the years of hard work by the park rangers and conservation volunteers.

The 25¢ stamp which features the Norfolk Abutilon Abutilon julianae this low growing plant was rediscovered on Phillip island in 1985 by an abseiler involved in the rabbit eradication program, previously it had been declared extinct as it had been last seen in 1914 on Mt Bates so the rediscovery was cause for some celebration. Along with other species in imminent danger of extinction the Abutilon plants propagated from this single plant have been actively planted back on Norfolk Island in rehabilitation works around the parks and gardens, this Abutilon should not be confused with the Common Abutilon A grandiflorum which also grows on Norfolk but is a weed and grows into a shrub, where this endemic variety is more like a ground cover in habit!

The 60¢ stamp features the Phillip Island Hibiscus Hibiscus insularis. This lovely plant is now found naturally occurring only on Phillip Island, an uninhabited Island 8km south of Norfolk. Through propagation it is now fairly widespread as a hardy garden plant. In fact Jerry Coleby-Williams of Gardening Australia has it for a hedge in front of his own house, he reckoned it made a brilliant hedge. Many gardeners have mistakenly thought this Hibiscus comes from the other Phillip Island off the coast of the Australian state of Victoria. If grown from seed, in it's juvenile stages the leaves are small and round, constantly changing with the years and unrecognisable as a hibiscus until circa 5-10 years old. As flowering only begins when it's adult foliage is produced (11-16 years old) the plant is mostly propagated by cuttings if the desire is for the ornamental flowering specimen. This hibiscus is special in that it has smaller leaves and flowers, (only a third to half the size of normal hibiscii) the flowers start off cream-green and morph yellow and orange with age until they reach pink-maroon.

The $1.55 stamp features the Popwood Myoporum obscurum These rather pretty Trees have shiny pointed leaves often with a black tip,an attractive rounded shape and useful in partly exposed positions. their pretty white flowers are dabbed with mauve-cerise spots and small upstanding hairs on the petals. With the increase in competition from weeds and presence of grazing cattle, Popwood numbers were reduced to less than 20 in the 1980's. Thankfully they are now out of the woods and on the road to recovery being planted like the others in the park rehabilitation and gardens as ornamentals again. Some publications suggest the further common names of bastard Iron wood and Sandalwood for this species but this is incorrect and have not been used for this species, they are probably being confused by Pouteria costata the Bastard Ironwood.

Lastly the $2.25 stamp Broad Leaf Meryta Meryta latifolia the population of which was reduced to around 20 female plants at one time, this plant is dioecious (has separate male and female plants) so both sexes need to be close to enable viable seeds. These plants are now popular garden plants both in private and public gardens. Their very large and attractive shiny leaves , were used in convict days wrapping dough for bread baking.
There is a narrow leaf meryta M augustifolia here on our beautiful Island as well!

KAVHA World Heritage 1st Anniversary
world heritage front
Technical Details:
Issue Date: 1st August 2011
Values: 12 x 60¢
FDC $7.75
Designer: 2899 Design
Printer: Southern Colour Print NZ
Layout: 12 stamp booklet
Prod. Qty:

 

world heritage stamps

This Issue of stamps commemorates the first anniversary of Kingston & Arthur's Vale Historical Area's declaration of world heritage

flaghouses stamp
click stamp for more info from KAVHA

N. I Police Force 80th Anniversary
Technical Details:
Issue Date: 14th October 2011
Values: 60¢, $1.55, $2.25
FDC $4.95
Designer: 2899 Design
Printer: Southern Colour Print NZ
Layout: 50 stamp/sheet
Prod. Qty:

15000

This Issue Commemorates 80 Years of policing on Norfolk Island and shows the evolution of the police force over the years.
Established on 14.10.1931 though the (Norfolk Island) Police Act 1931, the NIPF is the principle law enforcement agency for Norfolk Island (NI),
and it operates on behalf of the Government of NI and the Commonwealth of Australia.
The NIPF’s responsibilities include tasks such as Community Policing, Commonwealth Law Enforcement, Critical Incident Coordination including Search and Rescue,
and is also a key partner in Norfolk’s Emergency Management infrastructure along with a range of statutory obligations, responsibilities and conventions.
One Sergeant (OIC) and two Senior Constables are seconded from the Australian Federal Police to the NIPF.
Additionally, there are 4 local Special Constables (one full time and three part time).
(60c) The very first NIPF OIC William Fellowes on his horse leading the Anniversary (Bounty) Day procession (circa 1932).
($1.55) The Police Sergeant 2nd class G.A. Hinks (circa 1970’s), driving the police wagon.
($2.25) Police Constable T. Thompson along side the Police van checking the seas as the Cruise ship sails into view.
Christmas 2011
Technical Details:
Issue Date: 14th October 2011
Values: 15¢, 55¢, 60¢, $1.35,
FDC $3.20
Designer: Mary Butterfield
Printer: Southern Colour Print NZ
Layout: 50 stamp/sheet
Prod. Qty:

15000

Flowers that are found in many of the gardens of Norfolk Island are the theme of this years Christmas stamps and at this time they are a wonderful reminder of our Creator’s great work.
Mary has presented these flowers beautifully and they seem to complement this lovely spring weather that we are experiencing right now.
(15c) Proteas are native to southern Africa and belong to the same family of plants as the Australian banksias, grevilleas and waratahs. With about 1600 species, it is one of the plant groups which now dominate the southern hemisphere floras. Several species of proteas decorate Norfolk Island gardens.
(55c) Plumeria or Frangipani as this fragrant flower is called throughout the South Pacific, is known as the lei flower and used to make necklaces. Plumeria is found in many colours and native to the warm tropical islands of the Pacific ocean.
(60c) Cordyline or Routi as it is known on Norfolk and Pitcairn Islands. Its bright red and green leaves are often used to make hula skirts in the Pacific Islands. On Norfolk it is often used as a decoration for the lovely traditional island hats.
($1.35) Orchids are a diverse and widespread family of monocots in the order Asparagales. They are currently believed to be the largest family of flowering plants with between 21,950 and 26,049 currently accepted species.